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20131028
20131105
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CSPAN2 4
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English 17
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
civil rights and he introduced civil rights legislation. i think that speech ennobled his presidency. and his presidency was flawed. the cuban missile crisis, the step up in vietnam. but what he said on civil rights to me was a shining moment. he taught about civil rights is a moral right, as something that's clear is the constitution and the soul of the scriptures. that night, after he gave that speech, his popularity went from 60% to 47% like that. ebbers was murdered that night. john f. kennedy went into the presidency as most presidents do, thinking foreign policy is going to be their biggest issue. with kennedy, it really wasn't. civil rights became an issue that he really hadn't seen and didn't know how to cope with. but i thought the speech he made in june of 63 was phenomenal and based on that, and knowing everything that we know, i would vote for john f. kennedy. >> host: and in your book, "let freedom ring," the president afraid he might well democrats, southern segregationist dragged its feet on proposing comprehensive civil rights legislation. those who wanted him to stan
recently signed the civil rights act and was on his way to a landslide victory that november. and a 35-year-old tom foley was having lunch in downtown spo can. a gifted lawyer from a prominent local family and trusted aid to scoop jackson. some mentioned to the guys he was eating lunch with he was thinking seriously about running for congress, not this time but the next time around. at which point one of his lynch companions bluntly dismissed the idea out of hand and said you'll never do it. you're like all young people. you think the party is going to come to you with a tiffany tray and an engraved card and say please, we humbly beg you, run for congress. and that isn't the way it happens. people get to congress by wanting to run for congress. you've got excuses this year and you'll have excuses next year and the year after that. well, tom didn't like this little piece of armchair psychology one bit and he was determined to prove them wrong. so he got up from the table and walked over to the library across the hall, stuffed himself into a phone booth and called western union. within minute
's also very expensive, too. it's a civil right. but it's very expensive for these women they a to hire drivers to do all this back and forth. it limits their freedom. >> there are some subtle changes happen, whether that's one of them -- nobody was locked up or anything like that. a lot of women were out there driving >> it's a good thing. >> more power to them. >> the u.s. dealing with allegations of spying on world leaders. a high profile british phone hacking at trial started today in london. >> this is a big deal, too. former top editor of the now defunct news of the world tabloid rebekah brooks, you see her there, and andy call son hon later became a prime ministerial advisor an us cooed of conspireing to illegally access cell phone messages. >> the phones belonged to the rich and famous, even regular folks. they were spying on them the tabloid was part of rupert murdoch's empire that includes fox news and "the wall street journal" in the united states. >> it's going to be fascinating hear what comes out of that. it's changed how the tabloid media operated in great britain. >> abs
's says the company is reaching out to communitier leaders and bringing in a civil rights expert to preview procedures. michael is here, ceo of -- the jay-z part we're looking at. jay-z is saying, i'm waiting to hear the tacks. that's a good or bad tactic? >> he may be on the right site of facts but as a p.r. person, we are very skeptical of what organizations say, and it shows how hard it is, that even jay-z doesn't get the best interest of the doubt on something like racial profiling. so hey has to do more than what he is doing now. >> then there's this new macy's claim which isn't about macy's. this is about nypd. >> we always tell people that it's not just about the facts. the facts won't set you free. people have to be able to put this into context, be able to understand the whole story. and right now macy's is not going to get the benefit of the doubt. so they need to be able to tell the story that people are going to believe. right now they haven't done that. >> what do you do besides get out and say our policy is we don't do this. do they need to be more forceful. >> the
, for instance, filibusters were extraordinarily rare. what i remember from my childhood was over civil rights. that was the main issue. but they happen once in a decade, maybe. but in the last 20 years, they've happened repeatedly, and it's become so that you can't pass a bill without 60 votes. that's an extraordinary thing, and i think that that's happened largely because of a change in the republican party which has polarized the parties in washington and made it very hard for the government to function. >> just a little bit of data here. so, we're about to enter, i think, into a protracted battle over a nominee to the d.c. circuit appellate court, which is considered the sort of most important court in the land beneath the supreme court. and in terms of nominees, clinton had 77% of his judicial nominees confirmed at this point in his presidency, bush, 92% and barack obama coming in third at 75%. and here's a great upside down example of what this obstruction looks like. you have a situation now in which senator chuck grassley is basically saying that president obama, in trying to appoint a
is the civil rights issue of our time but dramatically raising the quality of education in america is also essential for sustaining our competitive posture in the world and securing our long-term economic futures. thankfully, there are proven reforms that are being implemented in growing pockets throughout our nation that we know work. the key to improving education is widespread embrace of higher expectations and higher standards including the common core, more accountability, much more parental choice of every type, ending social promotion, the insidious policy that passes kids along without them learning the basics things. to improve the quality of teaching in the classrooms and more innovation in technology, improving education was my first priority as governor. it was where my passions were and continue to be and i guess it's the reason i have been invited here tonight and i thank you for allowing me to be part of a movement to make sure that every child learns in america and that we rebuild our country in a more optimistic way rather than trying to redistribute wealth which has faile
. education reform is the civil rights issue of our time, but dramatically raising the equality of education is also essential for sustaining our competitive posture in the world and securing our long-term economic future. thankfully, there are proven reforms that are being implemented and growing pockets throughout our nation that we know work. the key to improving education is widespread embrace of higher expectations and higher standards, including the common core, more accountability, much more parental choice of every kind, ending social promotion, this insidious policy that passes kids along without them learning the basic things and thinking their self-esteem matters more than whether they can calculate math or read. improving education was my first priority as governor. it was where my passions were. i guess it is the reason why i have been invited here tonight. i thank you for allowing me to be part of the movement to make sure that every child learns in america and that we rebuild our country in a more optimistic way rather than trying to redistribute wealth. [applause] here is wha
up to our headquarters in harlem. we had other civil rights leaders. he says they did not make the complaint to police. i said if you didn't make the complaint, how did the police know about the purchase? you have to remember, both of them left the store. so, they said their custom is to let you finish the purchase. >> they are looking at cameras and calling the clerks. >> based on race. if you have a debit card, you have the receipt and the money is taken out of your account. where is the crime and the probable cause? is this a new york city phenomenon? >> we get this a lot. >> from national chains? >> from national chains. we called a meeting of ceos to talk about this major change. there must be a change in policy. and there must be some instruction in the police departments. >> have you talked to the cops about this? >> the stores must deal with the police departments. if you are claiming it's the cops, not us, what are you saying? the cops are saying it's you. what are they saying to you? we are caught in the middle. >> if you have a receipt, a debit card and shopping bag,
of them have active civil court cases going right now. after the 26 that have settled, 60 million dollars, you know, when you average that out across the 26, it does appear that penn state is paying a premium to get out from under these cases. but there are some reasons for that. >> ifill: and what are the reasons for the premiums? >> first of all, as a practical matter, i mean when we say that it appears that they're paying a premium, that's based on some analysis that we've done as a paper comparing this settlement with other large 25 or more claimant sexual abuse case. and most of those are in the realm of the roman catholic church scandals. so if you use those, and i think there's some, you know, it's not completely apples to apples but on the other hand that's an institutional entities that's trying to get out from under n many cases, multiple claims of abuse. penn state's an institution that's trying to get out from multiple claims of abuse. so there is some relevance there. in the church cases, i think the largest of those large group settlements came in at about $825,000 per claim
others to review how we strike the right balance including the review group on intelligence and communications technology and the privacy and civil liberties oversight board. our review is looking across the board at our intelligence gathering to ensure that was as we gather intelligence, we are properly accounting for both the security of citizens and our allies and the privacy concerns shared by americans and citizens around the world. we also need to ensure that our intelligence resources are most effectively supporting our foreign policy and national security objectives that we are more effectively weighing the risks and rewards of our activities that we are focused above all on threats to the american people. we need to ensure are collecting information not just because we can but because we should. because we need it for our security. so again, i won't go on too long. i think it's important top context you'llize some of these revelations to look at what the administration is doing to review our intelligence activities and to look at how we balance the need for security
and we honor rafael rivera in nevada. it's a special day for us in nevada. on october 31, 1864 right in tilled the middle of the civil war nevada became the 36th state of the union. nevada was only one of two states to join the union during the war. the first was west virginia way seceded from virginia to remain part of the union and it gained state hood before nevada. union sympathizers rushed to ensure lincoln's reelection. this was right before his reelection. in fact, they were so eager to admit a state they telephone graphed the constitution to congress. it was the longest telephone graph i ever sent, i should say telegram, coming in at 16,543 words. costing $59,294.92. mr. president, 80 days later president lincoln was reelected president of the united states. nevada's only one of two states to significantly expand its borders after admission to the union. eastern southern nevada joined the state in the late circuits after gold was discovered in both regions. many nevadans believe the state was allowed to join the union so its mineral riches could fund the nevada war effort. i
. in the true tradition of everett mckinley dirksen and abraham lincoln, men who gave us the 1964 civil rights act and the 13th amendment to the constitution. with that, i would suggest an absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: mr. grassley: madam president? the presiding officer: the senator from iowa. mr. grassley: i ask consent to lift the quorum. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. grassley: madam president, would i be in order to speak about judges we're going to vote on? the presiding officer: you would be in order. mr. grassley: okay. i rise in support of the nominations of debra m. brown to be u.s. district judge, northern district mississippi, and gregory howard woods to be u.s. district judge for the southern district new york. before we vote on these nominations, i want to inform my fellow senators and the american people, and inform them again on the excellent progress that we made on nominations and fair treatment of president obama's nominees and confirming the nominees of the president. with these confirmations today, the
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)